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OTHER CARD GAMES


Non-Poker Card Games

 


If your group is willing to venture beyond the boundries and confinements of traditional poker, these other card games are definately worth a try.

The games described on this page are not actually poker games. That said, they can be challenging and lots of fun to play just the same and they also provide a change of pace to your home card game.

Many of the popular casino games can also be played at home such as blackjack or baccarat (punto banco)

Of course the most popular non poker casino game is Blackjack (aka twenty one) and if you want to play a great strategic non poker game at the online casino, you can learn to play Baccarat (Chemin-de-fer) like James Bond in Dr. No.



Old Man 49er

 

Old Man 49er is a game based on a point system described below. The pot is split between the player with the highest point total and the player with the lowest point total. However, should a player have a five card hand that totals exactly 49, that player wins the entire pot.

Cards are valued as follows: Aces are worth one or eleven, at the player's election. Face cards are worth zero. All other cards (2-10) are worth their face value.

Deal five cards down to each player. After a round of betting each player may discard and draw up to four cards, beginning with the player to the dealer's left. Once the draw is completed, players stack their cards in front of them, face down, in the order they wish to reveal them. Once stacked the order may not be changed.

Start a round of betting beginning with the player to the dealer's left. Remaining players simultaneously expose the top card of their stack. The player with the highest exposed total begins each betting round. Players alternate exposing and betting until each player has four cards exposed and one card remaining. At this point, players must declare their hand as high, low or both. There is a final round of betting, then the showdown where each player reveals their last card.


Red Dog

 

Each player antes. Deal each player 5 cards. In turn, each player has the option of making a wager against the pot in any amount they choose. They are wagering that they hold a card in their hand that is of the same suit and a higher rank than the next card dealt from the deck. If they do, they win the amount of their wager from the pot. If they do not, they must pay the amount of their wager to the pot.

As an example, suppose the cards dealt to a player were: K♣ QQ♠ 8 3. If they wager, they win if the next card off the deck is: 2♣-Q♣, 2-J, 2♠-J♠, 2-7. They lose if the card is: A♣, K-A, K♠-A♠ or 9-A. Aces are always played as high card. Each player has one chance to pass or bet. If all the money in the pot has not been won, another round is played.


Zero to 55

 

A high-low split game with the object being to get as close to ZERO or 55 points as possible. The player closest to zero wins low; the player closest to 55 wins high. Players may declare both ways, but must win both outright.

Card values: All face cards are valued as 0 or 10 points. The ace of spades is valued as 1 or 12. The aces of diamonds, hearts & clubs are valued 1 or 11. All other cards are face value (2-10). Best possible high hand = 4 aces and face card = 55 (or valued as 4 if going low). Best possible low hand is all face cards = 0 (or valued as 50 if going high). Suits do not matter, except for ace of spades as noted above.

How it's played: Deal each player 5 cards face down and follow with a round of betting. Each player can now draw up to 4 cards (limit to 3 cards if 6 or more players). A optional method of play is to charge a fee to exchange cards, rather than allowing a free draw. Set the fee at about 1 or 2 antes per card.

Once players have drawn their cards and determined their hand, they arrange them in the order they want to reveal them. Once set they CANNOT change the order. Players place their cards face down in a pile on the table. All players reveal their top card at the same time, a round of betting follows. All players reveal the second card at the same time, a round of betting follows. This continues until all players have only 1 card face down.

At this point, it might be impossible to tell who is going high and who is going low, which makes this game more fun. A player may have revealed 4 face cards (for 0 or 40) and the last card is a 10, making him go high with a total of 50. A player may have revealed 2 face cards and 2 aces (for 2 or 42) and the last card is a 3, making him go low for a total of 5.

Before the last card is revealed, all players declare high or low or both. Again, a player going both ways MUST WIN both ways. Should they lose or tie in one direction, they lose in both directions.


5 1/2 - 21 1/2

 

A high-low split pot game with the objective of getting as close to 5½ points or 21½ points, without going over.

Cards are valued as follows: All aces count 1 or 11 points. All face cards count ½ point. All other cards count face value (2-10).

Start the game by dealing 1 card down and 1 card up to each player and follow with a round of betting. Starting with the player to the left of the dealer, each player now has the option of standing with their current hand or drawing another card, which is always dealt face up. A round of betting occurs once each player has exercised their option. Play continues in this manner until all the players decline taking another card during the same round. At that point a final round of betting occurs, then players declare their hand to be high, low or both.

Players may draw or decline a card at any time. Their future choice is not bound by their previous choice(s). That is, a player may decline a card on 1 round, accept a card on the next, decline on a following round.

The winning low hand is that hand closest to 5½ points without going over. The "without going over" is an important requirement. For example, a player holding 2 face cards for a total of 1 point will beat a player holding a total of 6 points. The winning high hand is that hand closest to 21½ points without going over. For example, 17 (or any total of 21½ or less) would beat 22. The only exception to this is if only 1 player declares in that direction, they win regardless of their total points even if over 5½ or 21½. If a player declares both high and low (not a likely decision in this game) they must win in both directions.


Seven - Twenty Seven

 

A high-low split pot game in which the objective is to get as close to 7 or 27 points without going over.

Cards are valued as follows: All aces count 1 or 11 points. All face cards count ½ point. All other cards count face value (2-10).

Start the game by dealing 1 card down and 1 card up to each player and follow with a round of betting. Starting with the player to the left of the dealer, each player now has the option of standing with their current hand or drawing another card, which is always dealt face up. A round of betting occurs once each player has exercised their option. Play continues in this manner until all the players decline taking another card during the same round. At that point a final round of betting occurs, then players declare their hand to be high, low or both.

Players may draw or decline a card at any time. Their future choice is not bound by their previous choice(s). That is, a player may decline a card on 1 round, accept a card on the next, decline on a following round.

The game is player exactly like 5½ - 21½. The only difference is that the point objectives are 7 and 27. This change, however, accomplishes important two things:

1. The game will usually last a round or 2 longer, since there is a higher point total to chase. Pots will usually be bigger.

2. There is the potential of a player to win both high and low. A hand with 2 aces, plus any other card(s) totaling 5 points will have both the perfect 7 low and the perfect 27 high. But, to declare both high and low means having to win both of them outright. A tie in one direction results in losing in both directions.

The winning low hand is that hand closest to 7 points without going over. The "without going over" is an important requirement. For example, a player holding 2 face cards for a total of 1 point will beat a player holding a total of 8 points. The winning high hand is that hand closest to 27 points without going over. For example, 22 (or any total of 27 or less) would beat 28. The only exception to this is if only 1 player declares in that direction, they win regardless of their total points even if over 7 or 27. If a player declares both high and low they must win in both directions.

Variation: Start the game by dealing each player 3 cards - 2 down and 1 up.


Badugi

 

Badugi is a Korean card game that has spread to countries around the world and its popularity has grown tremendously. It is available on many internet poker sites, even though it is not a poker game.

The goal of Badugi is to get a hand that consist of cards of different ranks and suits. The game is played with four betting rounds and three opportunities to draw cards. The biggest difference between Badugi and poker games is that Badugi is played with only four cards. Badugi is best played with no more than 6 players to avoid running out of cards.

Deal 4 cards face down to each player followed by a round of betting. Each player may now draw up to 4 cards. There are 3 drawing rounds and a round of betting following each.

The object of Badugi is to end up with the four lowest cards of different suits and ranks. The best possible hand, therefore, is A-2-3-4 with no two cards of the same suit. Any hand composed of four different suits is called a “Badugi” and is ranked better than any hand in which two or more of the cards are of the same suit or rank.

If a player ends up with a hand that contains a pair or two cards of the same suit, one of those cards is disqualified and the hand is valued as a 3 card hand. If there are three cards of the same suit and/or rank, two of the cards are disqualified and the hand is valued as a 2 card hand. Any Badugi beats any 3 card hand and any 3 card hand beats any 2 card hand.

For example:
K♣ Q J T♠ beats A♣ 2 3 3♠ (pair) or A♣ 2 3 4 (2 suited cards).
When comparing hands of the same number of cards the highest cards of each hand are compared and the hand with the lower card wins. For example:
8♣  7  6  5♠ beats 9♣  3  2  A♠ (8 is lower than 9).